Category Archives: Miner

Noisy Miner chicks just out of their nest

All fluffy and chirpy, three little Noisy Miners have taken their first steps out of their nest.

My previous post showed the chicks being fed in the nest. Now, just four days later, they’re on a branch, bunched together, preening and demanding food. The adults are still very much in attendance.

This still shot shows a chick outlined in the early morning sun:

Noisy Miner chick

Here are the three chicks, looking fluffy and cute but with the characteristic gimlet glare of the Noisy Miner:

Noisy Miner chicks

Common name: Noisy Miner, also called Australian Miner

Scientific name: Manorina melanocephala

Approximate length of adult bird: 26 cm

Date spotted: 17 September 2016

Season: Spring

Location: Allambie Heights, New South Wales, Australia

Latitude/longitude: 33°46’13.7″S 151°15’39.8″E

Noisy Miners feeding chicks in nest

Noisy Miners live up to their name. If they lived in California, Hitchcock would surely have used them as inspiration for The Birds. They cheep and squeak at everything in sight, and frequently attack everything in sight too. They’re also known as Australian Miners.

This nest has three chicks, cheeping continuously. The adult birds drop in to feed them every now and then. At one stage in the video, one of the chicks stretches up and flaps its wings. Getting ready for that first flight.

Interestingly, the adult birds feeding the chicks aren’t necessarily the parents. Other birds in a Miner colony often help to feed the babies. Noisy Miners are honeyeaters. They eat nectar, fruit and insects.

Noisy Miner chicks in nest

Common name: Noisy Miner, also called Australian Miner

Scientific name: Manorina melanocephala

Approximate length of adult bird: 26 cm

Date spotted: 13 September 2016

Season: Spring

Location: Allambie Heights, New South Wales, Australia

Latitude/longitude: 33°46’13.7″S 151°15’39.8″E

Noisy Miner attacking a Brush-turkey

It’s a common sight in Australia, especially in spring: a small bird dive-bombing a larger one. The small bird is usually a Noisy Miner, although other types do it too. The larger bird can be a kookaburra, a raven, a cuckoo – you name it. In fact, Australian birds are likely to attack anything, including people.

On Thursday morning this week, I saw a Brush-turkey under attack from a Noisy Miner. The first couple of videos are in a fairly low resolution, because I was using my phone camera.

Late that afternoon I passed by the same spot, and the miner and turkey were still at it! Two very stubborn birds. This video shows why Australians who are fond of their gardens tend not to be so fond of the Brush-turkeys. You’ll see a cunning dive from the miner at one point too:

Eventually, the Brush-turkey decided discretion is the better part of valour and headed out into suburbia. I had my Canon camera with me this time, so you can see the turkey in full splendour:

Peace at last, although you can still hear the Noisy Miners heckling:

 The Noisy Miner:

Common name: Noisy Miner

Scientific name: Manorina melanocephala

Approximate length: 26 cm

The Brush-turkey:

Common name: Australian Brush-turkey

Scientific name: Alectura lathami

Approximate length: 60 cm

 

Date spotted: 27 November 2014

Season: Late spring

Location: Allambie, New South Wales, Australia

Latitude/longitude: 33°46’18.0″S 151°15’42.6″E